Tracking Cell Lineages of Single Cells

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Entry by Andrew Capulli, AP225 Fall 2011

Reference

"Tracking lineages of single cells in lines using a microfluidic device" Amy C. Rowat, James C. Bird, Jeremy J. Agresti, Oliver J. Rando, and David A. Weitz, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 106(43), 18149–18154 (2009).

Introduction: Motivation

While some cell lines continue to express apparently similar phenotypes over time as they replicate, other cell populations don't replicate at all (or do so very minimally). Take the human body in say, ten years of aging: skin tissue and the cells therein are relatively conserved, meaning the skin you have at the starting point will look and will physically be very similar to your skin in 10 years. Cardiac myocytes, those that make up your heart tissue will also 'look' the same but for a different reason: for the most part, they are the same. How these cells