Difference between revisions of "Temperature-Controlled Transitions Between Glass, Liquid and Gel States in Dense p-NIPA Suspensions"

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==Summary==
 
==Summary==
 
In this paper, the authors demonstrate that concentrated p-NIPA suspensions in a low-temperature glassy state can liquefy and then solidify again as the temperature is raised across the LCST. They use temperature- and pH-responsive particles made of p-NIPA. To measure the LCST of the particles, they perform differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and find an endothermic peak.
 
In this paper, the authors demonstrate that concentrated p-NIPA suspensions in a low-temperature glassy state can liquefy and then solidify again as the temperature is raised across the LCST. They use temperature- and pH-responsive particles made of p-NIPA. To measure the LCST of the particles, they perform differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and find an endothermic peak.
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To determine the temperature dependence of the particle volume, V ( T ), dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used while to determine the temperature dependence of the particle volume fraction, they measure the viscosity using an Ubbelohde tube. They find that the intrinsic volume fraction k ( T ) and V ( T ) display the same temperature dependence, as shown in Figure 1.
  
 
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Revision as of 03:25, 30 November 2010

Original entry by Sagar Bhandari, APPHY 225 Fall 2010

Reference

Temperature-Controlled Transitions Between Glass, Liquid and Gel States in Dense p-NIPA Suspensions, G. Romeo, A. Fernandez-Nieves, H. M. Wyss, D. Acierno and D.A. Weitz, Advanced Materials

Keywords

microgels, p-NIPA, glass, liquid, temperature-controlled, transitions

Summary

In this paper, the authors demonstrate that concentrated p-NIPA suspensions in a low-temperature glassy state can liquefy and then solidify again as the temperature is raised across the LCST. They use temperature- and pH-responsive particles made of p-NIPA. To measure the LCST of the particles, they perform differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and find an endothermic peak.

To determine the temperature dependence of the particle volume, V ( T ), dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used while to determine the temperature dependence of the particle volume fraction, they measure the viscosity using an Ubbelohde tube. They find that the intrinsic volume fraction k ( T ) and V ( T ) display the same temperature dependence, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1:

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Figure 2:

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Figure 3:

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