Difference between revisions of "Sonication-Assisted Synthesis of Large, High-Quality Mercury Thiolate Single Crystals Directly from Liquid Mercury"

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==Summary==
 
==Summary==
The conventional approach to make mercury thiolate crystals is by a slow reaction of mercury salts with thiolates or disulfides to produce micrometer sized plate-like crystals of mercury thiolate. In this paper, the author discusses a new technique to produce such crystals -  via sonication with neat thiols.
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The conventional approach to make mercury thiolate crystals is by a slow reaction of mercury salts with thiolates or disulfides to produce micrometer sized plate-like crystals of mercury thiolate. In this paper, the author discusses a new technique to produce such crystals -  via sonication with neat thiols. The authors report that when a mixture of liquid mercury and an excess of neat 1-dodecanethiol was subjected to a medium-intensity ultrasound, rapid phase transition was observed, resulting in the formation of large crystals.
  
 
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Revision as of 15:55, 1 November 2010

Original entry by Sagar Bhandari, APPHY 225 Fall 2010

Reference

Sonication-Assisted Synthesis of Large, High-Quality Mercury Thiolate Single Crystals Directly from Liquid Mercury, Pokroy B, Aichmayer B, Schenk AS, Haimov B, Kang SH, Fratzl P, Aizenberg J., J Am Chem Soc. 2010 Oct 20;132(41):14355-7.

Keywords

mercury thiolates, sonication, self-assembly

Summary

The conventional approach to make mercury thiolate crystals is by a slow reaction of mercury salts with thiolates or disulfides to produce micrometer sized plate-like crystals of mercury thiolate. In this paper, the author discusses a new technique to produce such crystals - via sonication with neat thiols. The authors report that when a mixture of liquid mercury and an excess of neat 1-dodecanethiol was subjected to a medium-intensity ultrasound, rapid phase transition was observed, resulting in the formation of large crystals.

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