Difference between revisions of "Profile of a large drop"

From Soft-Matter
Jump to: navigation, search
(MATLAB code)
 
Line 25: Line 25:
 
To visualize your own large drop profiles, copy and paste the following two MATLAB scripts into two corresponding files. Then run dropshape.m -- it will automatically plot the profile. You can adjust the contact angle by variying the parameter "angle" in dropshape.m.
 
To visualize your own large drop profiles, copy and paste the following two MATLAB scripts into two corresponding files. Then run dropshape.m -- it will automatically plot the profile. You can adjust the contact angle by variying the parameter "angle" in dropshape.m.
  
dropshapeODE.m
 
 
<pre>
 
<pre>
 
% dropshapeODE.m
 
% dropshapeODE.m
Line 43: Line 42:
 
</pre>
 
</pre>
  
dropshape.m
 
 
<pre>
 
<pre>
 
% dropshape.m
 
% dropshape.m

Latest revision as of 18:23, 18 February 2009

Zach Wissner-Gross

Discussion

Figure 1: Drop profiles for various contact angles and using the physical constants given in class.

In class we derived the profile <math>z(x)</math> of a large drop as being:

<math>\sigma_{lv}(\frac{1}{\sqrt{1+\dot{z}^2}}-\cos\theta_e)=\frac{1}{2}\rho g(2ez-z^2)</math>

where we had defined <math>e</math> as being the maximum height of the drop:

<math>e=2\kappa^{-1}\sin{\frac{\theta_e}{2}}</math>

and <math>\kappa=\sqrt{\frac{\rho g}{\sigma_{lv}}}</math> was the inverse capillary length.

To visualize what the edge of a large drop then looks like, you can use the following two MATLAB programs (see below), which will solve and plot the above differential equation. Figure 1 also shows what some of these plots look like.

In class we had a brief discussion as to the nature of the drop's periphery on superhydrophobic surfaces. In the superhydrophobic limit (i.e., as <math>\theta_e</math> approaches 180 degrees), will the edge of the drop have a semicircular shape? The shape is apparently not semicircular at 179 degrees, since the horizontal range of the drop is only 1 mm, while it vertically extends to a height of

<math>2\kappa^{-1}\approx 3.5 \text{mm}</math>

Nevertheless, the bottom left corner of the 179 degree profile does resemble a quarter-circle.

MATLAB code

To visualize your own large drop profiles, copy and paste the following two MATLAB scripts into two corresponding files. Then run dropshape.m -- it will automatically plot the profile. You can adjust the contact angle by variying the parameter "angle" in dropshape.m.

% dropshapeODE.m

function df = dropshapeODE(dt,y)

global angle;
theta = pi/180 * angle;
sigma = 30*10^(-3);
rho = 10^3;
g = 9.8;
kappa = sqrt(rho*g/sigma);
E = 2/kappa*sin(theta/2);

X = cos(theta) + kappa^2/2*(2*E*y-y^2);
df = sqrt(1/X^2-1);
% dropshape.m

global angle;
angle = 100;

theta = pi/180 * angle;
sigma = 30*10^(-3);
rho = 10^3;
g = 9.8;
kappa = sqrt(rho*g/sigma);
E = 2/kappa*sin(theta/2);

y0 = [0];
[Xout,Yout] = ode45('dropshapeODE',[0 5*kappa^(-1)],y0);

dydx = zeros(size(Xout)-1);
if theta > pi/180 * 90
    dydx = (Yout(2:end)-Yout(1:end-1))./(Xout(2:end)-Xout(1:end-1));
    [p q] = max(dydx);
    for i = 1:q
        Xout(i) = 2*Xout(q)-Xout(i);
    end
    Xout = Xout-Xout(1);
end

figure(1);
clf;
hold on;
plot(Xout,Yout);
axis equal;
A = axis;
axis([A(1) A(2) 0 A(4)]);
box on;