Organic Field Effect Transistor Using Pentacene Single Crystals Grown by a Liquid-Phase Crystallization Process

From Soft-Matter
Revision as of 02:58, 28 October 2009 by Bonificio (Talk | contribs) (Soft matter discussion)

Jump to: navigation, search

Original entry: William Bonificio, AP 225, Fall 2009

Information

Organic Field Effect Transistor Using Pentacene Single Crystals Grown by a Liquid-Phase Crystallization Process. Yasuo Kimura, Michio Niwano, Naohiko Ikuma, Kenichi Goushi, Kingo Itaya. Langmuir 2009 25 (9), 4861-4863

Soft matter keywords

Liquid-Phase Crystallization, Pentazene, Organic Field Effect Transistor (OFET), Pentacene, Tricholorbenzene.

Summary

The purpose of this study was to investigate a different fabrication technique for creating single crystals of pentacene to be used for organic field effect transistors. The liquid-phase crystallization process creates single crystals by evaporating off a solvent when pentacene is in solution. The pentacene crystals formed by this method then had their semiconducting properties measured and these properties were compared to pentacene crystals grown using different methods.

Soft matter discussion

The structure of pentacene.


The top image is an atomic force microscopy image of pentacene single crsytal. The bottom image is the height along the white arrow from the top image.

Organic field effect transistors (OFETs) have many favorable properties over current field effect transistors (FETs). The most popular OFET, due to its optimal electronic properties derived from its delocalized pi bond, is pentacene. These properties however, are degraded by the existence of grain boundaries in polycrystalline pentacene as a result of the reduced mobility in charge carriers. Therefore, single crystals of pentacene are primarily used. The most popular way of synthesizing the single crystalline pentacene is currently by physical vapor deposition.

An alternative method of creating pentacene single crystals is by liquid-phase crystallization.