Difference between revisions of "Optical tweezer arrays and optical substrates created with diffractive optics"

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Tom Dimiduk
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Original Entry: Tom Dimiduk APPHY 225 Fall 2010
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[http://www.eng.yale.edu/softmatter/papers/dufresne.rsi.1998.pdf Optical tweezer arrays and optical substrates created with diffractive optics]
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==Keywords==
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Optical Tweezers, Colloids, Assembly
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== Summary==
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[[Image:dufresne_holo_tweezers_fig1.png|thumb|left|400px|Figure 1: Optical setup for holographic optical tweezers.]]
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[[Image:dufresne_holo_tweezers_fig2.png|thumb|left|400px|Figure 2: "FIG. 2. 4x4 Optical tweezer array created from a single laser beam using a holographic array generator. (a) The tweezer array illuminates the 70x70 <math>\mu m^2</math> field of view with light backscattered from trapped silica particles. The scale bar represents 10 <math>\mu m</math>. (b) The particle array 1/30 s after being released. (c) The same field of view 3.1 s later. (d) Trajectories of the particles in the field of view after being released. Dark traces indicate particles initially trapped in the array. Shorter tracks indicate particles which diffused out of the <math>\pm 200 nm</math> depth of focus."]]

Revision as of 21:23, 17 November 2010

Original Entry: Tom Dimiduk APPHY 225 Fall 2010

Optical tweezer arrays and optical substrates created with diffractive optics

Keywords

Optical Tweezers, Colloids, Assembly

Summary

Figure 1: Optical setup for holographic optical tweezers.
Figure 2: "FIG. 2. 4x4 Optical tweezer array created from a single laser beam using a holographic array generator. (a) The tweezer array illuminates the 70x70 <math>\mu m^2</math> field of view with light backscattered from trapped silica particles. The scale bar represents 10 <math>\mu m</math>. (b) The particle array 1/30 s after being released. (c) The same field of view 3.1 s later. (d) Trajectories of the particles in the field of view after being released. Dark traces indicate particles initially trapped in the array. Shorter tracks indicate particles which diffused out of the <math>\pm 200 nm</math> depth of focus."