Difference between revisions of "Modeling Menisci and Capillary Forces from the Millimeter to the Micrometer Size Range"

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== Summary ==
 
== Summary ==
  
The research presented in this paper investigates capillary interactions from the millimeter to sub-millimeter scales by examining the shape of PFD (perfluorodecalin) and water interfaces and its interactions with hyrophobic and hydrophillic materials.
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The research presented in this paper investigates capillary interactions from the millimeter to sub-millimeter scales by examining the shape of PFD (perfluorodecalin) and water interfaces (i.e. immiscible fluid-fluid interface) and its interactions with hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials. By studying the shapes of these interfaces, energy profiles can be derived to characterize the different types of interactions (e.g. attraction, repulsion).  The investigators use both computer simulations as well as experimental evidence to draw conclusions.  For the computer modeling, when finding an analytical solution using the Laplace equation applied to two infinite surfaces was impossible, the menisci shapes were determined numerically using [http://www.geom.uiuc.edu/software/evolver/ Surface Evolver] which applies a Finite Element Method (FEM) to model the contours of the menisci. 
  
 
== Soft Matter ==
 
== Soft Matter ==
  
 
Currently writing...
 
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Revision as of 15:24, 19 September 2009

Original Entry by Michelle Borkin, AP225 Fall 2009

Overview

"Modeling Menisci and Capillary Forces from the Millimeter to the Micrometer Size Range."

Bartosz A. Grzybowski, Ned Bowden, Francisco Arias, Hong Yang, and George M. Whitesides. J. Phys. Chem. B, 2001, 105 (2), pp 404–412.

Keywords

Capillarity, Meniscus, hydrophobic, hydrophilic, Self-Assembly, thin films

Summary

The research presented in this paper investigates capillary interactions from the millimeter to sub-millimeter scales by examining the shape of PFD (perfluorodecalin) and water interfaces (i.e. immiscible fluid-fluid interface) and its interactions with hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials. By studying the shapes of these interfaces, energy profiles can be derived to characterize the different types of interactions (e.g. attraction, repulsion). The investigators use both computer simulations as well as experimental evidence to draw conclusions. For the computer modeling, when finding an analytical solution using the Laplace equation applied to two infinite surfaces was impossible, the menisci shapes were determined numerically using Surface Evolver which applies a Finite Element Method (FEM) to model the contours of the menisci.

Soft Matter

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