Difference between revisions of "Meniscus"

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(New page: == Definition == A meniscus is a curvature in the surface of a fluid (e.g. water) as a result of molecular interactions with a container or object. If the meniscus is convex, then the mo...)
 
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== Definition ==
 
== Definition ==
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[[Image:meniscus.gif|thumb|alt=Meniscus examples.|Sample menisci with water on the left (concave meniscus), and mercury on the right (convex meniscus).]]
  
A meniscus is a curvature in the surface of a fluid (e.g. water) as a result of molecular interactions with a container or object.  If the meniscus is convex, then the molecules have a stronger attraction to themselves than the container or neighboring object (with the inverse being true for concave).
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A meniscus is a curvature in the surface of a fluid (e.g. water) as a result of molecular interactions with a container or object.  If the meniscus is convex, then the molecules have a stronger attraction to themselves than the container or neighboring object (e.g. mercury which is non-polar thus not attracted to its glass container).  If the meniscus is concave, then the molecules have a stronger attraction to the container or neighboring object than themselves (e.g. water which is polar and attracted to a glass container).  With a concave meniscus, capillary action in a container will result in pulling the fluid upward to increase the contact area between the interfaces (energetically favorable).
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
  
 
*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meniscus
 
*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meniscus
*[[Modeling Menisci and Capillary Forces from the Millimeter to the Micrometer Size Range]]
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*Israelachvili, Jacob.  ''Intermolecular & Surface Forces.''  London: Academic Press, 1991.

Revision as of 02:19, 18 September 2009

Definition

Meniscus examples.
Sample menisci with water on the left (concave meniscus), and mercury on the right (convex meniscus).

A meniscus is a curvature in the surface of a fluid (e.g. water) as a result of molecular interactions with a container or object. If the meniscus is convex, then the molecules have a stronger attraction to themselves than the container or neighboring object (e.g. mercury which is non-polar thus not attracted to its glass container). If the meniscus is concave, then the molecules have a stronger attraction to the container or neighboring object than themselves (e.g. water which is polar and attracted to a glass container). With a concave meniscus, capillary action in a container will result in pulling the fluid upward to increase the contact area between the interfaces (energetically favorable).

References