Difference between revisions of "Hydronamic Coupling of Two Brownian Spheres"

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(New page: ==Reference== Eric R. Dufresne, Todd M. Squires, Michael P. Brenner, and David G. Grier, "Hydrodynamic Coupling of Two Brownian Spheres to a Planar Surface", ''Physical Review Letters'...)
 
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==[[Reference]]==
 
==[[Reference]]==
 
Eric R. Dufresne, Todd M. Squires, Michael P. Brenner, and David G. Grier, "Hydrodynamic Coupling of Two Brownian Spheres to a Planar Surface", ''Physical Review Letters'' '''2000''' ''85(15)'', 3317-3320
 
Eric R. Dufresne, Todd M. Squires, Michael P. Brenner, and David G. Grier, "Hydrodynamic Coupling of Two Brownian Spheres to a Planar Surface", ''Physical Review Letters'' '''2000''' ''85(15)'', 3317-3320
  
 
==[[Introduction]]==
 
==[[Introduction]]==
Soft  nanotechnology is the branch of nanotechnology concerned with the synthesis and properties of organic and organometallic nanostructures, and soft components plays key roles with nanofabrication. Soft nanotechnology has the potential to apply to a wide variety of large-scale applications such as information technology, healthcare cost reduction, sustainability, and energy and fundamental problems which are related to molecular biochemistry, cell biology etc.  
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This paper describes direct imaging measurements of the collective and relative diffusion of two colloidal spheres near a flat plate. The bounding surface modifies the spheres' dynamics and this behavior is captured by a stokeslet analysis of fluid flow driven by the spheres' and wall's no-slip boundary conditions. This reveals surprising asymmetry in the normal modes for pair diffusion near a flat surface.  
[[Image:softmatter.png|thumb|350px| Figure 1. Soft matter]]
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==[[Faraday Discussion]]==
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==[[Results]]==
Soft nanoscience has developed with backgrounds in organic and organometallic chemistry. It has been derived from molecular synthesis and has generated a broad range of new types of nanostructures: colloids, vesicles, polymers, molecular aggregates, self-assembled monolayers, and other small structures. Faraday discussion shows a broad spectrum of work as following, representative of the work going on in soft nanoscience: biology, nanoactuation, nanomechanics, vesicles, molecular recognition, polymers, synthesis, properties, and interfaces.
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Technology advances both forward and backward: from science and knowledge forward to applications, and from problems backward to technology for the solutions. There are a lot of areas which are thought to be particularly appropriate for soft, chemistry-based nanotechnology: electronics, biomedicine, new materials, and energy.
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==[[Discussion]]==
 
==[[Discussion]]==
Faraday discussion suggess a cross section of the interests and competencies of soft nanosciences. Some of the original possibilities have been replaced by equally important but very different problemsL focused extension or replacement of processes for fabricating information processors, sustainability, energy production and conservation, imaging and genomics, and water. Soft nanotechnology will become engaged in the most important of these problems, from their scientifically interesting beginning to their societally beneficial end.
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Confining surface can influence colloidal dynamics even at large separations, and that this three-surface coupling is accurately described by a leading-order stokeslet approximation. This results suggest that the same formalism can be applied to more general configurations of spheres and bounding surfaces. Wall-induced hydrodynamic interactions may influenced nonequilibrium optical tweezer measurements of confined colloidal interactions and may have contributed to the observed attractions between like-charged spheres.

Latest revision as of 04:37, 14 November 2011

not completed yet


Reference

Eric R. Dufresne, Todd M. Squires, Michael P. Brenner, and David G. Grier, "Hydrodynamic Coupling of Two Brownian Spheres to a Planar Surface", Physical Review Letters 2000 85(15), 3317-3320

Introduction

This paper describes direct imaging measurements of the collective and relative diffusion of two colloidal spheres near a flat plate. The bounding surface modifies the spheres' dynamics and this behavior is captured by a stokeslet analysis of fluid flow driven by the spheres' and wall's no-slip boundary conditions. This reveals surprising asymmetry in the normal modes for pair diffusion near a flat surface.

Results

Discussion

Confining surface can influence colloidal dynamics even at large separations, and that this three-surface coupling is accurately described by a leading-order stokeslet approximation. This results suggest that the same formalism can be applied to more general configurations of spheres and bounding surfaces. Wall-induced hydrodynamic interactions may influenced nonequilibrium optical tweezer measurements of confined colloidal interactions and may have contributed to the observed attractions between like-charged spheres.