Difference between revisions of "Fluorosurfactant"

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(New page: Fluorosurfactants, or fluorinated surfactants, are synthetic organofluorine chemical compounds that have multiple fluorine atoms. They can be polyfluorinated or fluorocarbon-based (perfluo...)
 
 
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Fluorosurfactants, or fluorinated surfactants, are synthetic organofluorine chemical compounds that have multiple fluorine atoms. They can be polyfluorinated or fluorocarbon-based (perfluorinated). As surfactants, they are more effective at lowering the surface tension of water than comparable hydrocarbon surfactants. They have a fluorinated "tail" and a hydrophilic "head." Some fluorosurfactants, such as PFOS, are detected in humans and wildlife.
 
Fluorosurfactants, or fluorinated surfactants, are synthetic organofluorine chemical compounds that have multiple fluorine atoms. They can be polyfluorinated or fluorocarbon-based (perfluorinated). As surfactants, they are more effective at lowering the surface tension of water than comparable hydrocarbon surfactants. They have a fluorinated "tail" and a hydrophilic "head." Some fluorosurfactants, such as PFOS, are detected in humans and wildlife.
  
==Physical and chemical properties==
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Fluorosurfactants can lower the surface tension of water down to a value half of what is attainable by using hydrocarbon surfactants.<ref name=Salager2002>{{cite paper |last=Salager |first=Jean-Louis |title=Surfactants-Types and Uses |version=FIRP Booklet # 300-A |pages=45 |publisher=Universidad de los Andes Laboratory of Formulation, Interfaces Rheology, and Processes |date=2002 |url=http://nanoparticles.org/pdf/Salager-E300A.pdf |format=PDF |accessdate=7 September 2008}}</ref> This ability is due to the [[lipophobic]] nature of fluorocarbons, as fluorosurfactants tend to concentrate at the liquid-air interface.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.masonsurfactants.com/Products/Fluorosurfactant.htm |title=Fluorosurfactant &mdash; Structure / Function |work=Mason Chemical Company |accessdate=1 November 2008}}</ref> They are not as susceptible to the [[London dispersion force]], the basis for [[lipophilicity]], because the [[electronegativity]] of [[fluorine]] reduces the [[polarizability]] of the surfactants' fluorinated molecular surface. Therefore, the attractive interactions resulting from the "fleeting dipoles" are reduced, in comparison to hydrocarbon surfactants. Fluorosurfactants are more stable and fit for harsh conditions than hydrocarbon surfactants because of the stability of the [[carbon–fluorine bond]]. Likewise, perfluorinated surfactants persist in the environment for that reason.
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==Reference==
 
==Reference==
 
1.[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorosurfactant]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorosurfactant
 
1.[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorosurfactant]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorosurfactant
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== Keyword in references: ==
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[[Biocompatible surfactants for water-in-fluorocarbon emulsions]]

Latest revision as of 01:55, 29 November 2011

Fluorosurfactants, or fluorinated surfactants, are synthetic organofluorine chemical compounds that have multiple fluorine atoms. They can be polyfluorinated or fluorocarbon-based (perfluorinated). As surfactants, they are more effective at lowering the surface tension of water than comparable hydrocarbon surfactants. They have a fluorinated "tail" and a hydrophilic "head." Some fluorosurfactants, such as PFOS, are detected in humans and wildlife.


Reference

1.[1]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorosurfactant

Keyword in references:

Biocompatible surfactants for water-in-fluorocarbon emulsions